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…A daily one-hour shutdown of our devices: I’m talking mandatory blackout! We all know the physical and mental toll our phones and laptops take, yet we rarely walk away from them. Imagine the freedom of not having to answer a text, like a photo, reply to an email for one whole hour…and knowing everyone around you is free of that burden, too. What would you do? What brilliant idea would you think of? Who would you actively listen to?

As a part of my series about the women in wellness, I had the pleasure of interviewing Leah Wyar, Vice President and General Manager…


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Your story trumps your resume. When you interview, or present your bio onstage, it’s an order of magnitude more powerful to tell your story than to recite your resume — the why behind your choices, on top of the what. It’s a talent, for sure, but one that can be learned, and it comes down to connecting the dots of your history for your audience so that they walk away feeling like they don’t just know who you are, they understand you. It’s also an opportunity to be authentic, which is the key to connection. So you can say, for example, things like, “I initially only took that job because the comp was great and I had student loans to pay back, but what I didn’t expect was to find my calling in business development and fall in love with the travel industry.” …


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Preventive care should be a right. Everyone should be able to get all vaccinations and preventive care without a copay.

As a part of my interview series with leaders in healthcare, I had the pleasure of interviewing Theresa Rohr-Kirchgraber, MD, an internist and adolescent medicine physician. She is the executive director of the IU National Center of Excellence in Women’s Health and president of the American Medical Women’s Association 2015–2016.

Thank you so much for doing this with us! Can you tell us a story about what brought you to this specific career path?

As a first generation college student, I thought I was doing pretty well just by going to college. Luckily, I participated in an AHEC program in high school where I worked in a local nursing home. I had no idea about medicine but the program opened my mind to health care as an option. …


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1. Keep a diary of your ideas and work on expanding them to make self feel secure.

2. Think before you speak! Listen and learn first to others who know more truths

3. Avoid panicking, Instead organize, and structure life in ways that feel safe.

4. Be creative with arts, music, sports that unite people in peaceful times.

5. Always see both sides of the coin and be gentle in how you apply your input.

As a part of my series about the things we can do to develop serenity and support each other during anxious times, I had the pleasure of interviewing Professor Margaret Rogers Van Coops, Ph.D. DCH(IM). Prof. Margaret is renowned for her Mediumship, her research into the paranormal, psychology, psychiatry, hypnosis, and numerous healing modalities. She has written 15 educational and helpful books, novels and screenplays and has her own radio show: Journey Into An Unknown world on webtalkradio.net where her talks are educational and very informative. Her education courses and private sessions have taken her to over fifteen countries in over 50 years, keeping her active and now about to teach bi-monthly on zoom where she will help people with their issues.


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We are all stuck in a comparison trap! Our social media feeds (and our minds) are constantly bombarded with images of perfect bodies, too-pretty-to-eat salads and tropical landscapes. It’s no wonder we aren’t satisfied with what we look like, how we eat, or where we live. This all feeds into the belief that “we’ll be happy when” XYZ happens, and in the meantime, our lives are passing us by! Try to limit your social media time (Apple’s new feature is great for this) and unfollow accounts that make you feel less than. Every time you want to reach for the phone to scroll, text a friend, take a walk or just inhale and exhale. …


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Create a classical conditioning habit. We all remember Pavlov and his dog that would salivate every time he rang the bell. We can condition our body to want to do things through triggers. For instance, I light candles and turn the lights off at night to do my stretching routines. This shift in the atmosphere gets me in the right mindset every time.

As a part of my series about “5 Lifestyle Tweaks That Will Dramatically Improve One’s Wellbeing,” I had the pleasure of interviewing Vanessa Barthelmes, an aerial & yoga instructor, author and creator of the fitness blog www.jadorevanessa.com.

Thank you so much for doing this with us! Our readers would love to “get to know you” a bit better. …


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In my personal yoga practice as well as in my classes, I am a great believer of using yoga to set goals and intentions. In a meditative state, such as during the centering part of yoga or savasana, the final resting pose, the mind is open to receiving messages. I tell my students to make their intentions even more powerful by connecting it to their breath patterns. When you set an intention and voice it, you are sending it out into the Universe and the Universe will respond…

As a part of my series about “5 Lifestyle Tweaks That Will Dramatically Improve One’s Wellbeing,” I had the pleasure of interviewing Anita Perry.


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Avoid overexposure to negative news. While it’s good to know what is going on in the world, consuming the same news over and over can severely impact your physical and mental health. Bad news puts you in a state of fight, flight or freeze, and this hyperarousal causes an increase in adrenaline as we feel our survival is being threatened. This stress response is normal in small doses, but too much time in the red zone is not healthy.

As a part of my series about the things we can do to develop serenity and support each other during anxious times, I had the pleasure of interviewing Mark Stephens.


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Practice empathy. It’s easy to be empathic when you naturally “get” what another person is feeling. For example, when someone trips, or when you’re watching a game and they miss a shot, you have an idea what that feels like. Your highly sensitive partner may remind you of Shakespeare’s “Much Ado About Nothing.” Why is she or he so upset at your suggestion you get together with friends tonight at the end of a day with family? It’s hard to empathize emotionally with your partner. …


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Be prepared to work insanely long hours. There are inherent sacrifices in accomplishing anything of significance. I spend my entire day working on and thinking about the company and don’t allocate much time for anything outside that lane. You really have to love what you’re doing because any rational person would quit when things get tough. It’s that passion that gets you through the late nights and early mornings.

I had the pleasure of interviewing Shane Wathanasaynee. Shane is a 26-year-old former professional golfer and the co-founder and CEO of Enchanted Express. …

About

Carly Martinetti

2x pet tech founder, publicist, writer, and dog mom. I love learning about what makes CEOs tick.

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